blog young people autism

Hello! Welcome to Dancing Wombat!

Hi everyone! I’m Jennie Irving.

Dancing Wombat is my blog for all of us who nurture, guide and teach kids with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other associated, complex conditions*.

Dancing Wombat is a treasure trove of gems of daily lived experience — routines, conversations, experiments, failures, hard-won milestones, bone-weariness, hilarity, anguish and relief.

Like anyone, I get things right and wrong as I raise and teach young people with ASD. I don’t promote particular ways of thinking or claim to be an expert. My blogs are my conversation with you.

Delve in and enjoy my stories — I love writing them! I hope Dancing Wombat gets you thinking differently about ASD, and comforts and encourages you. Best of all, Dancing Wombat is proudly agenda free, ad free and therapeutic!

*Other ASD-related conditions include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intellectual disability (ID), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), depression and anxiety.

Drop in – share your ideas and experiences, frustrations and triumphs.

Our Blog

Scaffolding for independent learning

Scaffolding supports things, including you and me We’ve all walked past scaffolding. Those skeletons of poles and platforms positioned around buildings to support their construction (and protect us), then gradually removed as they’re no longer needed. When you go...

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The jigsaw puzzle and what I’ve learnt

Jigsaws have enjoyed a resurgence, thanks to #stayhome. Apparently even Hugh Jackman is a fan, so we’re in good company! I’ve always enjoyed jigsaws. In the mid 1980s, when I was 17, a car accident saw me in hospital for two weeks. There was no such thing as a...

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About Jennie Irving

 

I’m a believer in small things that can make big goals happen.

Based in the beautiful city of Melbourne, Australia, my life journey has taken me from corporate law to language teaching to performing arts teaching in a small specialist education setting…together with raising four great kids, three of them with ASD.

I believe that sharing and talking about our experiences — the good, the bad and the ugly — help overcome silence and stigma so we can build a more understanding and caring community where people with special needs genuinely belong, can prosper and flourish.

Small voices matter. Mine is a small voice among many that, together, can roar.

blog young people ASD
blog young people ASD